Tag Archive for James Preller

Sneak Peak: Final Art & Sketch from ALL WELCOME HERE, Coming in June!

Sneak peak at a spread from our upcoming picture book, ALL WELCOME HERE, illustrated by the great Mary GrandPre. Coming in June (we think!), from Macmillan. It’s a first day of school story, told in connected haiku. Do yourself a favor, click on the image to see it larger and appreciate the colors and details in Mary’s artwork. She is best known, of course, for doing the art in the U.S. editions of the Harry Potter books. So talented — and kind, too!

 

Just for comparison, here’s the rough sketch Mary submitted to the publisher. Here’s where much of the most important work takes place: the thinking, the plotting, the visual organization. Here Mary takes two separate haiku and unifies them in one “moment” that captures several distinct realities, if you will. As much as I admire Mary’s palette and technique, I might most respect her intellectual rigor. The way she thinks about her work before dipping a single brush into paint.

Sometimes in this business you just get lucky. That’s how I feel about Mary doing the artwork for this book. Lucky me.

Good News: Green Earth Award Nomination for BEE THE CHANGE

“A fresh new series
nudging emerging readers towards social change
and kindness toward others.”

Booklist.

 

       

I never expected this. Bee the Change, the 3rd book in my “Big Idea Gang” series (all published in 2019), was nominated for an actual award.

Where I live, being nominated is an award. So, yeah, I’m just going to eat a whole bag of marshmallows now. Back in sec.

Whoa, chest pain. Back to the good news!

Illustration by Stephen Gilpin.

But win it? I don’t think so, and that’s okay, it’s nice just to be recognized for contributing something positive, and earth-friendly, for young readers.

There’s literally a zillion books nominated for the “long list,” so I encourage you to JUMP ON THIS LINK for the complete lowdown on about 100 titles (not quite a zillion, admittedly), ranging from picture books to young adult, including fiction and nonfiction.

ABOUT THE GREEN EARTH BOOK AWARD

The Green Earth Book Award is given annually to children’s and young adult literature that best conveys the message of environmental stewardship.  They have bestowed the award for the past 15 years to bring national recognition to important works and their authors with its highly qualified “seal of approval” for environmental literature.  The winners are chosen by a panel of literary, environmental and educational professionals.

“Now, more than ever, these and many other eco-authors are delivering the goods that our younger generation hunger for –- how to make our planet healthy and sustainable,” said The Nature Generation President Amy Marasco. 

The 2020 Green Earth Book Award Short List and winners will be announced on April 22, 2020 – Earth Day. Winners will be awarded in the fall at the Salisbury University Children’s & Young Adult Literature Festival.

ABOUT THE “BIG IDEA GANG”

First: oh yeah, I like that, “eco-authors.” Nobody ever called me that before. It’s catchy.

The series grew directly out of our current political reality. These are simple stories about empowerment, about a diverse group of young people making a small difference in our world. And by featuring persuasive writing as a subtext, the books help provide some of the tools that are necessary for changing minds, for becoming powerful instruments of positive change. Hopefully these little books (grades 2-4) will help inspire a new generation of budding activists. The books intentionally focus on kindness and cooperation, on compassion and friendship, on seeing the world at an extremely local level and working together to make it better.

FROM BOOKLIST . . .

“Preller addresses topics such as kindness, activism, immigration, community involvement, and the dangers of gossip in an approachable way for a young audience. Readers will appreciate the numerous cartoon illustrations, short chapters with snappy titles, and large print with wide page margins . . . A fresh new series nudging emerging readers towards social change and kindness toward others.” — Booklist.

 

 

 

FAN MAIL WEDNESDAY #298: Request From a Teacher Who Wants to Read Online to Her Class

 

I’m sharing this letter from a 2nd-grade teacher since I know it’s representative of what’s going on out there for so many parents and educators. 

 

Good evening! 
I’m a second grade teacher in Harpers Ferry, West Virginia. My class has been reading some of your Jigsaw Jones books and I was wondering if I could have permission to create, maybe You Tube, a video that my students can access at home. Or, if you have another idea I am welcome to it! We are on chapter 9 of The Case of the Stolen Baseball Cards but I’d probably have to start at the beginning since it’s been over a week since we have been in school. 
We’ve already read The Case of Hermie the Missing Hamster and hope to read The Case of the Race Against Time next.
Thanks so much for your support!

Lori,

I replied . . . 
Lori,

Illustration by R.W. Alley from Jigsaw Jones: The Case of the Hat Burglar.

Thank you for your email. You are doing valuable work, and I appreciate the request. Yes, emphatically, by all means, read and share and keep doing what you do.

The only request I have, suggested by my publisher, is that you delete the videos once school is back in session.
My best to you. Stay smart, stay safe, protect the vulnerable.
With love in my heart (I’m growing extra-sappy in these times).
And again, I feel very strongly that I’m the one who should be thanking you.
James Preller

Summer Hours, School Visits, Free Books

I blinked and July appeared. No, that is not my new secret power. My blinking didn’t cause the calendar to turn. I was more trying to make a point about . . .

Nevermind.

Let’s try this: Whoa, July already!

Over the years, I’ve learned that readership slows during the summer months. In response, I don’t put up as much new content. Think of me as a turtle overwintering in the mud — but it’s summer, and it’s a blog, and there’s really no connection whatsoever.

I mean to say, it’ll be quiet around here, but not silent.

SCHOOL VISITS

Yes, please! Send your queries to me at jamespreller@aol.com. School visits are an important aspect of what I do, the role I play on this planet, and they mean the world to me.

For more information, click on the “School Visits” toward the top of your screen. Or just write to me to get the ball rolling. It’s friendly and personal and you will be dealing directly with me. I’m not a huge consortium of anything. Just Jimmy, trying to earn a living. Happy to speak on the phone.

BOOKS

I have two books coming out this summer. In fact, just got my complimentary author’s supply in the mail, a big box of The Big Idea Gang: Bee the Change.

I like this series a lot, and I’ve been grateful for the positive reviews.

To me, these are political books that came directly out of our current reality. These are simple stories about empowerment, about young people making a difference in our world. And by featuring persuasive writing as a subtext, the books help provide some of the tools that are necessary for changing minds, for becoming powerful instruments of positive change. Hopefully they will be inspiring to a new generation of budding activists. Check them out.

Or, hey: If you are a classroom teacher or school librarian interested in sharing these books with your students, drop me a line at jamespreller@aol.com. Make the subject heading: FREE BOOK. I’ll sign it and send it out to you while supplies last. 

On August 6th, we’ll see the publication of an all-new Jigsaw Jones title, The Case of the Hat Burglar. I’m so happy with this book. I had written 40 books about Jigsaw and Mila, and then there was a long fallow period when I was off writing other things (Six Innings, Bystander, The Courage Test, Better Off Undead, etc). I didn’t think I’d ever get the chance to visit those characters again. But things changed, opportunity knocked, and I was able to write a new Jigsaw Jones book after about ten years away. Thing is, I believe I’m a better writer today than I was 22 years ago when I wrote the first book in the series.

Thank you, faithful readers, so grateful you stopped by. Have a great summer — and please think of me for school visits. It’s one of my favorite things in the world to do.

 

Fan Mail Wednesday #290: An 8th Grader Responds to THE FALL

Here’s a long, insightful one that an 8th-grader read for Health Class after reading The Fall.

 

Dear Mr. Preller,

Hey Mr.Preller! This is an 8th grader from O’Rourke Middle School in Burnt Hills New York. My name is _______, writing to you about the book you wrote called The Fall. Outstanding book by the way! I really enjoyed reading it. This book, as you obviously are aware of addresses a lot of health topics, such as suicide, online bullying and many more. These factors made it perfect for choosing as far as the book I had to read for health.

The topic that I would like to talk address first in this book is the suicide. This is a very sad and realistic tragedy, but I must ask, why do you think in your professional opinion that Athena would make that hateful gesture by making that game? That question was just out of curiosity, and I know that it sadly does happen in real life, but was there any specific reason that you were inspired to write that? I really hope that didn’t come off as rude, I meant it in the kindest way possible.

This book, I feel is important for young people to read because of a few reasons: First, a lot if kids who are in their teenage and adolescent years struggle with depression and being bullied and, unfortunately, contemplate suicide. Second, I think the pressures that today’s society put on kids makes them think of suicide because they think there may be an easier way out. Did you know that there is 1 in 65,000 kids ages 10-14 that die from suicide every year? And that Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for 15-24 year olds and 2nd for 24-35 year olds?

My mom works in a school with young children and there are a lot more kids each year that need support for mental health reasons. She talks to me about the pressures that school, even at a young age, and the rate of learning and expectations, puts a lot more pressure on kids today. Each year more and more kids need mental health support and we have to ask ourselves, why?? Is it the growing pressures of school and the expectations that school and home puts on us? Is it the online social media that is so relevant in kids lives today? Is it a combination of both? Everything is thrown into kids faces. Be better, work harder, have the most friends, or you will amount to nothing. These are important questions we need to ask ourselves and find some answers to.

Kids lives are much harder now than they were when my mom was in school. When she played a sport, you didn’t have to try out to play. You just played. Now if you don’t play a sport all year round, and travel on a team, you don’t get picked to be on a team. You also get told by coaches that you need to play all year to get good enough to amount to anything. What happened to playing sports for fun? And just to get outside, make some new friends and play a casual game? Is this added pressure adding to the stress and kids feeling like they just aren’t good enough?

There are so many ways kids can reach out for help. First, I think parents should limit the amount of social media that kids are exposed to. The more accounts they have, the more likely that they are to have someone bully them and do hurtful things. Online bullying, in my opinion is worse than face to face bullying. People that don’t even know you can bully you and there is no way to stop it, other than get off social media. At least with a face to face bully you can try to stand up to them. Second, I think schools need to be more involved with their students and get to know them more. Make connections. The more adult connections a student has, I feel, the less likely they will be bullied or be tempted to bully. Last, I think kids have to remember that school is such a small part of their lives. Once they walk through the high school doors at graduation, they get to start over. Who they were in high school does not matter at all. If they were a nerd, they were smart, and will get a good job and start a new life!!

Once again, I really like this book and I also enjoy the fact that the book is not too long, just around two-hundred pages is perfect for me! If I may ask, what do you think your favorite part of this book that you wrote was? I think my most favorite part of this book was definitely when Sam started to feel remorse for Morgan and started feeling bad that he missed an opportunity. I also feel that it was good in the sense that he felt that it was partially his fault, and in a way I think it kind of is. The reason I make this claim, is because not only did he take part in the bullying game started by Athena, but he also kind of dipped out whenever anyone was near him when he was with her, it was almost like he felt ashamed to be near her, or embarrassed to be near her. I feel that just because he didn’t want to be next on the bullying list he excluded her, which I feel partially lead to her death.

I am so glad that I get to express my feelings with the author of this amazing book himself! I would also like to express how I feel about the main character himself, I feel that he was a good kid, but I also feel that he was too little too late in the act of caring for this poor girl. Then after her death, he decided to visit the place of the her death and stand right where she stood, people who have the guts to do that typically care very much about the person, which is why I don’t understand. If he cared about her, then why did he wait until she was dead to show it? In my honest opinion about this book, I would rate it a ten out of 10. I think this book deserves an award, just because it displays real world problems, and serious health topics that need to be addressed nowadays. I think that Sam’s biggest character strength, was his sympathy, although he was too late with his sympathy, he stilled showed it even though Morgan was deceased.

I also want to help people I know by telling them if they ever need someone to talk to, the suicide prevention line is always open for someone to listen. They can be reached at 1-800-273-8255. I hope my letter prompts some good discussions about the topic of suicide in your book.

Yours truly, Gabriel

I replied: 

Dear G,

I’m so glad you read The Fall.

I was inspired to write that book for a couple of reasons. I had already written Bystander, which took a look at bully-related issues. While not a sequel, I do see The Fall as something of a companion book, a further exploration into that specific darkness.

I’ve never felt comfortable with putting the label “bully” on any young person. Bullying is a behavior, a verb, not a person, not a noun. We are all complicated people, with countless characteristics and attributes. No person can be accurately labeled and put in a box: THE BULLY. We are many things. Walt Whitman: “I am large, I contain multitudes.” Friend, teammate, pet owner, son, poet, etc. Usually a so-called “bully” is a good person who is making some poor decisions. I believe we are more than our worst act.

So, there was that, the nagging idea that I wanted to give a sympathetic look at someone who bullied another person. Sort of rescue him from that narrow stereotype. Try to show the complexity of the issue, how a “good kid” can do a bad thing.

Then, one unforgettable day, I read about a 12-year-old girl who had committed suicide by jumping off a tower. The report stated that she was “absolutely terrorized” on social media. I immediately ached for that poor girl, her friends, her family. But I also thought of all those kids who wrote mean things to her on the internet, life’s little cruelties. Now they had to live with the consequences of those words. The things they did and didn’t do.

In my entirely fictionalized book, I didn’t try to explain the full reasons for Morgan’s suicide. I don’t think we ever really know why someone takes that final step. A chemical imbalance? Deeper issues at home? Bullying at school? It’s so hard to say. And, ultimately, I decided that wouldn’t be the focus of this book. I mostly wanted to tell Sam’s story, how he comes to “own” his actions, take responsibility. The book surprised me because, at the end, it becomes a meditation on the nature of forgiveness.

You are right that Sam fell short. Too little, too late. I think he tried his best to do the right thing. Life is hard, difficult, full of pressures, and we all make mistakes. I respect the process Sam went through on his own, with his journal, to honor, and remember, and account for Morgan.

Your mother makes a great point about anxiety and the pressures that so many young people seem to be experiencing. It’s hard to understand where, exactly, that comes from and what we can do to help.

G, your letter clearly demonstrates the work of a bright, active, perceptive mind. I was very impressed with it, and I’m grateful to have found a reader such as you. I fear that I failed to address all of the many ideas included in your letter, but hopefully you’ll be satisfied with this response.

Have a great summer! And look for my new book, Blood Mountain, coming this October. My wife says it’s my best book yet. I think she’s right!

James Preller