Archive for Blood Mountain

That Feeling When . . . You Just Hit Send!

 

Yesterday I hit “send.” A year late, but I got there. Wilderness survival story, involving a brother and sister. Think “Hatchet” meets “Misery” . . . and there’s a dog.

I can’t wait to see this book out in the world. It might be the best thing I’ve written.

Oh, while I have you: When I start a new book, I have a ritual. I go to CVS and purchase a composition notebook. It begins that way. Brainstorming, reading, filling a notebook with random ideas and inspirations. Eventually I get to the computer and start writing. With this book, because I had to learn so much, the pre-writing process — which includes note-taking, tons of reading, and a lot of scribbled ideas — took about 18 months before I could even start. Funny how that works.

For this book, I had the title from the beginning. Same thing with Six Innings and Bystander. Other books, titles can be a wicked struggle.

I love all the characters in this book, but most particularly Grace. She is fierce and strong and courageous. In some respects, it was easy to write about her. I just had to think of my daughter, Maggie.  

Should be published in Fall, 2019. Only my wife, Lisa, has read it so far. But as Pusha T says, “When you know, you know.”

 

Fan Mail Wednesday #279: Chubby Hubby Edition

Here’s one that came from not far away, via a librarian-friend who lives in my community.

Don’t you like the envelope?

Adelaida wrote:

I replied:

Dear Adelaida,

Well, it seems like we have a nice connection, since I’m friends and neighbors with your wonderful librarian, Ms. Furlong. Her daughter, a senior, is in the same school and grade as my daughter, Maggie. Meanwhile, her husband is a craft beer-loving, long-suffering Mets fan. I’m the same way about the Mets, though I’m not really a fan of fussy anything, including craft beer, haircuts, clothing, etc. Keep it simple.

What were we talking about? Oh, your letter! So happy to hear from you. You asked a few questions, so let’s see:

1) Letters like yours come to me from time to time. It always feels like a gift from the universe, like a new star appearing in the night sky. I’m grateful and humbled and, mostly, just heartened to meet another person, like me, who is enthusiastic about books. Any books.

2) I like “Chubby Hubby” by Ben & Jerry’s.

3) Two of my three children are devout vegetarians, so they’ll hate this answer: If it’s a special treat, yes, I love a good steak. I’m eating less red meat these days, but!

4) My favorite book so far is the one I’m currently finishing, Blood Mountain. It’s due to my editor, Liz, in two weeks. Should be available a year from now. It’s really pushed me to be my best –- I’ve had to learn so much just to write it accurately –- and I’m never been more absorbed in my work. In short: “Hatchet” meets “Misery,” plus there’s a dog. A brother and sister get lost in the mountain wilderness for six days. It’s exciting and suspenseful and, I hope, powerfully written.

5) Oh: I’ve included a gift. Don’t tell anybody!

My best,

James Preller

Works In Progress: “The Big Idea Gang,” and More!

 

In a somewhat bizarre twist of fate, I have six new books coming out in 2019: one picture book of haiku, celebrating the inclusiveness of the school community: All Welcome Here, illustrated by legendary Mary GrandPre of “Harry Potter” fame; a new Jigsaw Jones title, The Case of the Hat Burglar, illustrated by R.W. Alley; and for older readers, a heart-pounding middle-grade /YA adventure novel, Blood Mountain, with a brother and sister, ages 11 and 13, lost in the wilderness for six days. The new year will also see the launch of a chapter book series, grades 2-4, the “Big Idea Gang,” beginning with two books in January. Above you’ll see a rough sketch by Stephen Gilpin — who is incredible — from the third title, Bee the Change. Each book loosely or directly links into persuasive writing concepts, children using their powers of persuasion to make a difference in their/our world. Honeybees played a big role in my middle-grade zombie novel, Better Off Undead, and I’m not done writing about them yet. Other titles in the series: The Worst Mascot Ever and Everybody Needs a Buddy (featuring playground “buddy benches,” of course). As usual, I’m hoping elementary school readers find these books.

Now eagerly booking school visits. Give me a jingle!

Teachers: Protect These Words!

 

Words matter. Words are doors to perception, feeling, insight, understanding, connection. I feel this, strongly, and the ideas in this one sign are active and important in my current work in progress, a middle-grade adventure novel, Blood Mountain. (Think of it as “Hatchet” meets “Misery” — and there’s a dog.)

More and more I’m feeling the pull and importance of the natural world. Maybe it’s because of the internet and social media and cell phones and our disconnectedness with real things. As if we’ve been cut adrift, untethered, astronauts floating in space, clawing for air . . .

 

More on this issue another time. Thank you, Michael Namingha. And in the meantime, check out the books by Robert MacFarlane and, please, this post from me back in January: “Digging Up the Lost Words.”

But before you go, say it with me: acorn, ash, buttercup, dandelion, fern, ivy, mistletoe, nectar, pasture, willow . . .