Archive for February 3, 2017

Sample Art from the JAPANESE TRANSLATION of “Nightmareland”

One of the most humbling experiences for an author is when a book is translated. I’ve had that honor several times over the years, in languages ranging from Korean to German, Spanish to Greek, Arabic to Indonesian, and more. Each time, it’s like a gift falling from the sky. Usually I have no idea that the translation has been in the works. My work is long done. When I think of young readers on other continents holding my book . . . well, the imagination sputters, dumbfounded. This writing life has its ups and downs, believe me, so much failure and disappointment, but it’s an amazing career if you can be lucky enough to pull it off.

I have to say, I am especially loving the look of the Japanese translations from my “Scary Tales” series.

 

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Here’s the cover of Nightmareland and some interior art (shot from my camera, so these aren’t the best reproductions).

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For the record, I’m thrilled and grateful for the fine work that Iacopo Bruno did with the original books. I’m just lucky, I guess.

Here’s the original cover:

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THE POETRY OF DONALD TRUMP: “Black History!”

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BLACK HISTORY!

a poem by Donald Trump, taken verbatim from the transcript of his address at the “Black History Month” breakfast, and rearranged in free verse.

 

 

Well this is Black History Month, so

this is our little breakfast, our little

get-together. Hi Lynn, how are you?

Just a few notes.

 

During this month,

we honor the tremendous history of African-Americans

throughout our country. Throughout the world,

if you really think about it,

right?

 

And their story is one of unimaginable sacrifice,

hard work, and

faith

in America.

 

I’ve gotten a real glimpse—during the campaign

I’d go around with Ben to a lot of different places

I wasn’t so familiar with.

They’re incredible people!

And I want to thank Ben Carson, who’s gonna be

heading up HUD. That’s a big job. That’s a job

that’s not only housing, but it’s

mind

and spirit.

 

Right, Ben?

 

And you understand,

nobody’s gonna be better

than Ben.

 

Last month, we celebrated the life of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr.,

whose incredible example is unique in American history.

You read all about Dr. Martin Luther King a week ago

when somebody said I took the statue out of my office.

It turned out that that was

 

fake

news.

 

Fake            news.

 

The statue is cherished, it’s one of the favorite things in the

—and we have some good ones.

We have Lincoln,

and we have Jefferson,

and we have Dr. Martin Luther King.

 

But they said the statue, the bust of Martin Luther King,

was taken out of the office. And it was never even touched.

So I think it was a disgrace, but that’s the way

the press

is.

Very unfortunate.

 

I am very proud now that we have a museum

on the National Mall where people can learn

about

 

Reverend King,

so many other

things.

 

Frederick Douglass is an example

of somebody

 

who’s done an amazing job and is being recognized

more and more,

I noticed.

 

Harriet Tubman, Rosa Parks, and millions more

black Americans

who made America

what it is today.

 

Big impact.

 

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Fan Mail Wednesday #242: Letter from a Father Who Reads to His Teenage Daughter Every Night

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Today’s “Fan Mail Wednesday” is a little unusual. It’s a note from Ed, my teammate on the “Whiz Kids,” an old men’s hardball team. To date, he remains the only catcher who believes in my change-up.

 

Mighty Preller at the Bat.

Mighty Preller at the Bat.

 

Jim,
I hope you’re having a great off season. My daughter and I have a reading streak. My wife saw an article in the NYT about a father who read out loud to his daughter every night from grade 4 to her freshman year in college for at least 10 minutes. Kelsey and I decided to take on the challenge when she was in third grade. She is now a freshman at AAG . We have not missed a night. It the most special thing between us. We have read all kinds of books. We both get to make picks so I picked The Fall.


9781250090546.IN01It is a great book. As we read it I expected Kelsey to have strong opinions about Sam and Morgan and the actions of the other kids. Each night as we read the book she was very quiet and just went to sleep.


This all changed when Sam bought the jewelry for Morgan and dropped it off the tower. When I looked up Kelsey was crying. She had never done that before. At this point all her feelings about Sam and Morgan tumbled out. We had a great talk. She loved the book.

I know at times writing must be hard as you wonder who will read your book and how will it impact the reader. At our house The Fall was a perfect game. ED

 

I replied:

Ed,
Sorry it’s taken me a couple of days to respond. It’s hard to know what to say except for thank you for those kind words. It’s the nicest gift you can give a writer: 1) reading the book, and 2) saying something nice about it.
 
I remember reading about the young woman who read with her father that you referred to in your note. I think I might even have blogged about it, years ago. It’s amazing that you and your daughter have managed that same feat. I’m blessed to have (sort of) shared that experience with you, through my book.
The article was published in March 2010, written by Michael Winerip, titled "Father and Daughter Bond By Years of Reading." The daughter, Alice Ozma, eventually wrote a book about it, THE READING PROMISE: MY FATHER, AND THE BOOKS WE SHARED.

The article was published in March 2010, written by Michael Winerip, titled “Father and Daughter Bond By Years of Reading.” The daughter, Alice Ozma, eventually wrote a book about it, THE READING PROMISE: MY FATHER, AND THE BOOKS WE SHARED.

 
Thanks again,  Ed. I was moved by your letter. And I look forward to another season of baseball.
 
My best,
 
JP